ASTROLOGY OF A NEW AGE

When Did The Age of Aquarius Begin?

by Joelle Steele

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There has always been much debate about when the astrological ages begin and end, and there are many approaches to calculating those ages. But, using basic astrological symbolism, we can simply look at history and see when the ages began and ended. Since an astrological age is roughly 2,000 years in length — give or take, depending on the sign — we can begin by looking back in time to see when the Piscean Age might have ended and the Aquarian Age begun.

Some astrologers believe that the Piscean Age ended and the Aquarian Age began with the industrial revolution. This is actually unlikely, since industrialization did not come at any one point in history for the entire planet. It was, instead, a very gradual process that began from the mid- to late 18th century through the early to mid-19th centuries with numerous inventions in the fields of agriculture, travel, and manufacturing that had a profound effect on western agrarian civilization. This pattern of invention continued and spread until the middle of the 20th century. From that point on, most technology, as we call it today, became derivative, meaning it is just more or better technology built using existing technology. In other words, we went from being inventive to merely relying on what was invented previously. That's a big clue in itself when it comes to setting a date or date range for an age.

So, how do we characterize all of this industrialization, this invention, astrologically? Is it the inventions themselves or the skill to invent them that we should examine when trying to place the industrial revolution within an astrological age? Being inventive is definitely being creative. This is very clearly a Piscean trait. Someone had to create machines, create computers, create trains, create whatever technology it takes to make things run. But many things were created over the past 2,000 or so years. Great art and literature were likewise created during that time. We see many magnificent works of art created and a number of highly influential art movements that characterize innovation in the arts. Ditto with literature and music. Lots of creative energy being expended.

What happened? We still have art, music, literature, technology. What changed? We are no longer fostering creativity, that's what changed. There is nothing new under the sun. The end of a Piscean Age if there ever was one. Art is not taught in the public schools, at least not to the extent that it once was, when a good education meant one that included the arts as well as the sciences. Fewer students sign up for art or music classes as computers have become substitutes for skill in creativity. People think that just because they have a computer that they can be an artist, a writer, or a musician, and can broadcast their often-dubious creations worldwide over the Internet, regardless of their lack of innovation and talent. And what happened to individuality? This Piscean trait is likewise missing from our societies. The emphasis has shifted to the group and what is good for the group, or for society in general. Look at all the uprisings in Third World countries as they attempt to improve their societies. Sounds pretty Aquarian, doesn't it, that altruistic impulse that was almost non-existent just 50 years ago?

There are countless examples to support the Aquarian Age beginning around the 1950s, and now, after a few decades of overlap with the previous Piscean Age, coming into its full power. What will the future hold for our Aquarian generations? Socialism? Atheism? Illiteracy? Hard to tell. We're certainly in a very dark place when even television shows lack creative inspiration! We'll just have to wait and see what becomes of our society as decades turn into centuries under the Aquarian Age.

This article last updated: 06/27/2011.